A Mature persons guide to good Dental Health

A Mature persons guide to good Dental Health

Teeth are for life.

It is now expected that we should be able to keep all of our teeth for life 
As we get older, the condition of out teeth and gums changes along with our health, lifestyle and the way we eat. Gum disease is the most common cause of tooth loss in people over the age of 35. Old fillings with rough surfaces (of poorly fitting dentures/ crowns or bridges) make your teeth and gums more susceptible to disease (tooth decay and gum inflammation)

At the Harrow Dental Centre ® we recognise that every one has different needs .We will tailor your dental care to suit the restraints of your budget of time or money…because your healthy smile is important to us

If you have any questions or comments kindly post them below. Feel free to email us via the contact us button on the homepage of our website www.harrow-dentist.com


It’s Mom and Dad’s fault !

August  2019 — Can you blame mom and dad for your dental problems? ….   Maybe!

An international team of researchers identified dozens of new genes associated with oral health and dental diseases. Their findings suggest many dental traits are heritable.

Scientists have long known that two people with similar diets and oral hygiene routines can have vastly different levels of oral health.

The researchers identified 47 new genes connected to oral health. They also confirmed an association for a gene linking immune health and periodontal disease.

The links included some relatively obvious factors, such as genes involved with tooth and jaw formation, saliva, and oral bacteria. However, the analysis also suggested a causative relationship between cardiovascular-metabolic health and oral health, and genes responsible for dental caries may have an effect on the whole body too.

Many dental traits may be heritable, but dentists aren’t letting people off the hook for their own oral health. It’s still important to brush and floss  and have regular professional care — even if people  are found not not to be genetically predisposed to caries or gum problems.


Dental Phobia

Dental Phobia – August 2019

Everyone’s fears and phobias are different and have different levels.As a team we recognise that no two concerns are ever the same.

However, if just the thought of visiting your dentist really fills you with dread it could be time to take action. Bring a friend or family member with you to your first visit. This will help you to relax and not fell ‘alone’ in a strange place.

It is natural to be concerned about an experience where you feel you have no control. Neglect may cause you to run the risk of losing teeth through lack of oral care, but could also lose their confidence. Lost or yellowing teeth can all add up to making a person have lower self-esteem than others.

Some people become so embarrassed in social situations that they hide their mouth behind their hand when speaking or smiling and this can really start to affect a person’s whole life. This can result in their professional and personal life suffering to a tremendous degree. No one should have any form of fear of having dental care. We are here to help,after all we specialise in problems!

We want you to be as comfortable and happy about visiting us for treatment as possible. Through a combination of in depth discussion about all of your concerns and the procedures you need, our team will be with you every step of the way on your road to good oral health.

You may have cause to be fearful due to bad experiences in the past or even embarrassment, Our team has helped many people overcome their fears and some even begin to look forward to their dental appointments.

 


National Smile Month

The Harrow dental centre supports the National Smile Month

http://www.nationalsmilemonth.org/

 


Spit, don’t rinse

March 2019

While you sleep at night, you produce less saliva than during the day. Because of this, your teeth have less protection from saliva and are more vulnerable to acid attacks. That’s why it’s important to remove food from your teeth before bed so plaque bacteria can’t feast overnight. Don’t eat or drink anything except water after flossing and  brushing at night. This also gives fluoride the longest opportunity to work.

Once you’ve brushed, don’t rinse your mouth with water , you are washing away the fluoride contained in the toothpaste! This can be a difficult habit to break, but can reduce substantially reduce tooth decay.

www.harrow-dentist.com

Oral Hygiene advice


Smile

A smile can be really powerful.

A smile is the shortest distance between two people. An inhibited smile may unwittingly create a social or workplace barrier.

Take time to ask your dentist about anything that you feel is preventing you from feeling confident when you smile.

If you feel that your teeth are discoloured or have unsightly gaps, chipped teeth, or other cosmetic issues, you may be less likely to smile no matter what the situation.

Take care of your teeth, so you can enjoy all the benefits of a healthy smile, extending far beyond  your face.

Smile Makeover

www.harrow-dentist.com


Halloween

Here’s how you can help your family stay ‘MouthHealthy’ on Halloween and year-round.
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Time It Right

Eat Halloween sweets (and other sugary foods) with meals or shortly after mealtime. Saliva production increases during meals. This helps cancel out acids produced by bacteria in your mouth and rinse away food particles.

Stay Away from Sweet Snacks

Snacking can increase your risk of cavities, and it’s double the trouble if you keep grabbing sugary treats from the candy bowl. Snacking on candy throughout the day is not ideal for your dental health or diet,.

Choose Sweets Carefully

Make sure your sweets are sugar free.

Avoid hard sweets that stay in your mouth for a long time. Aside from how often you snack, the length of time sugary food is in your mouth plays a role in tooth decay. Unless it is a sugar-free product, candies that stay in the mouth for a long period of time subject teeth to an increased risk for tooth decay.

Avoid Sticky Situations

Sticky sweets cling to your teeth. The stickier candies, like toffee and gummy bears, take longer to get washed away by saliva, increasing the risk for tooth decay.

Have a Plan

It’s tempting to keep that candy around, but your teeth will thank you if you limit your stash. ‘Have your family pick their favourites and donate the rest.’

Drink More Water

Drink water, avoid a dry mouth this  can help prevent tooth decay. If you choose bottled water, look for kinds that are sugar free. Even sugar free ‘diet’ fizzy drinks may be acidic which cause harm to your teeth

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Maintain a Healthy Diet

Your body is like a complex machine.The foods you choose as fuel and how often you “fill up” affect your general health and that of your teeth and gums.

Stay Away from Sugary Beverages

This includes fizzy drinks, sports drinks and flavoured water.When teeth come in frequent contact with beverages that contain sugar, the risk of tooth decay is increased.

Chew sugar free chewing gum 

Chewing sugar free gum for 20 minutes after meals helps reduce tooth decay, because increased saliva flow helps wash out food and neutralise the acid produced by bacteria.

Brush Twice a Day

Brush your teeth twice a day for two minutes with a fluoride containing toothpaste. Change your tooth brush 8- 10 weeks , or sooner if the bristles are frayed. A worn toothbrush won’t do a good job of cleaning your teeth.

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Clean Between Your Teeth

Floss your teeth once a day. Decay-causing bacteria get between teeth where toothbrush bristles can’t reach. Flossing helps remove plaque and food particles from between the teeth and under the gum line.

Visit us   

The regular advice and care  you will receive from your dentist and the whole team will help you to stay healthy.

  www.harrow-dentist.com

 

Acknowledgements to the American Dental Association