Spit, don’t rinse

March 2019

While you sleep at night, you produce less saliva than during the day. Because of this, your teeth have less protection from saliva and are more vulnerable to acid attacks. That’s why it’s important to remove food from your teeth before bed so plaque bacteria can’t feast overnight. Don’t eat or drink anything except water after flossing and  brushing at night. This also gives fluoride the longest opportunity to work.

Once you’ve brushed, don’t rinse your mouth with water , you are washing away the fluoride contained in the toothpaste! This can be a difficult habit to break, but can reduce substantially reduce tooth decay.

www.harrow-dentist.com

Oral Hygiene advice


Smile

A smile can be really powerful.

A smile is the shortest distance between two people. An inhibited smile may unwittingly create a social or workplace barrier.

Take time to ask your dentist about anything that you feel is preventing you from feeling confident when you smile.

If you feel that your teeth are discoloured or have unsightly gaps, chipped teeth, or other cosmetic issues, you may be less likely to smile no matter what the situation.

Take care of your teeth, so you can enjoy all the benefits of a healthy smile, extending far beyond  your face.

Smile Makeover

www.harrow-dentist.com


Halloween

Here’s how you can help your family stay ‘MouthHealthy’ on Halloween and year-round.
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Time It Right

Eat Halloween sweets (and other sugary foods) with meals or shortly after mealtime. Saliva production increases during meals. This helps cancel out acids produced by bacteria in your mouth and rinse away food particles.

Stay Away from Sweet Snacks

Snacking can increase your risk of cavities, and it’s double the trouble if you keep grabbing sugary treats from the candy bowl. Snacking on candy throughout the day is not ideal for your dental health or diet,.

Choose Sweets Carefully

Make sure your sweets are sugar free.

Avoid hard sweets that stay in your mouth for a long time. Aside from how often you snack, the length of time sugary food is in your mouth plays a role in tooth decay. Unless it is a sugar-free product, candies that stay in the mouth for a long period of time subject teeth to an increased risk for tooth decay.

Avoid Sticky Situations

Sticky sweets cling to your teeth. The stickier candies, like toffee and gummy bears, take longer to get washed away by saliva, increasing the risk for tooth decay.

Have a Plan

It’s tempting to keep that candy around, but your teeth will thank you if you limit your stash. ‘Have your family pick their favourites and donate the rest.’

Drink More Water

Drink water, avoid a dry mouth this  can help prevent tooth decay. If you choose bottled water, look for kinds that are sugar free. Even sugar free ‘diet’ fizzy drinks may be acidic which cause harm to your teeth

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Maintain a Healthy Diet

Your body is like a complex machine.The foods you choose as fuel and how often you “fill up” affect your general health and that of your teeth and gums.

Stay Away from Sugary Beverages

This includes fizzy drinks, sports drinks and flavoured water.When teeth come in frequent contact with beverages that contain sugar, the risk of tooth decay is increased.

Chew sugar free chewing gum 

Chewing sugar free gum for 20 minutes after meals helps reduce tooth decay, because increased saliva flow helps wash out food and neutralise the acid produced by bacteria.

Brush Twice a Day

Brush your teeth twice a day for two minutes with a fluoride containing toothpaste. Change your tooth brush 8- 10 weeks , or sooner if the bristles are frayed. A worn toothbrush won’t do a good job of cleaning your teeth.

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Clean Between Your Teeth

Floss your teeth once a day. Decay-causing bacteria get between teeth where toothbrush bristles can’t reach. Flossing helps remove plaque and food particles from between the teeth and under the gum line.

Visit us   

The regular advice and care  you will receive from your dentist and the whole team will help you to stay healthy.

  www.harrow-dentist.com

 

Acknowledgements to the American Dental Association


Sparkling Water

Most people are aware of the dental perils of sugary soft drinks and fruit juices, but surely sparkling water is perfectly safe for your teeth, right? After all, dentists often recommend water as an alternative to sodas and sports drinks. It might surprise you to learn that it’s not quite so straightforward.

Soft drinks can be bad for your teeth because they tend to be loaded with sugar or non-sugar sweetener alternatives that feeds harmful oral bacteria, resulting in the creation of enamel-attacking acids. As the protective enamel layer is stripped away, it leaves the teeth exposed to infection and decay.

It is not just the sugar in soft drinks that threatens tooth health. It’s all the fizz.

Carbonated beverages get their fizz from carbon dioxide, which is converted to carbonic acid in the mouth. This acid has the potential to cause erosion of dental enamel and increase the risk of tooth decay.

One of the warning signs of enamel erosion in increased tooth sensitivity with exposure to hot or cold foods/drinks. Yellowing of the teeth may also signal enamel erosion as the white, shiny enamel gives way to the darker, yellower dentine underneath.

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Keeping Things in Perspective

Now before you start panicking and give up Perrier and Pellegrino forever, it’s important to note that even though sparkling waters can alter the acidic balance in the mouth, it pales in comparison to the sort of acidic damage that occurs with the likes of sodas, fruit juices and other sugary or sweetened beverages. That said, if sparkling water is your drink of choice and you’re sipping it throughout the day, it could accelerate tooth wear. Especially if you like the flavoured sparkling waters, or enjoy a slice of lemon or lime. The addition of any such flavourings or fruit increases the acidity of the beverage.

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Generally speaking, unflavoured sparkling water is considered fine for your teeth – in moderation! .A study found that both types of water were more or less the same in their effects on enamel, noting that sparkling water is slightly more acidic. So, all things in moderation – if you don’t overdo it with sparkling water, your teeth should be fine

  • Be sure to mix in plenty of fluoridated plain water along with sparkling water to help naturally fight cavities and maintain the healthy pH balance in the mouth.
  • Be mindful of the fact that all sparkling waters are not created equal. For example, citrus-flavoured waters increases the acidity levels of the beverage, increasing the risk for enamel erosion.
  • Watch out for sparkling water which  have sugar in them. Flavoured waters with sugar can be as bad as other sugar-laden drinks, so if you enjoy sparkling water, make sure you’re enjoying the real deal.

The team at the Harrow Dental Centre will be happy help if you have any concerns.

 


It is not what we eat or drink that effects tooth erosion but how we eat or drink .

It is not what we eat or drink that effects tooth erosion but how we eat or drink .Tooth erosion — also known as dental erosion or acid erosion — occurs when acids wear away tooth enamel, which is the substance that coats the outer layer of each tooth. Over time, this erosion could give rise to tooth discoloration, sensitivity and in the extreme, even tooth loss. Unsurprisingly, the analysis revealed that acidic foods and drinks posed the greatest risk of tooth erosion.

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The risk of moderate or severe tooth erosion is reported to be 11 times higher for adults who drank acidic beverages twice daily, particularly when they were consumed between meals, compared with those who consumed such beverages less frequently. When acidic drinks were consumed with meals, the risk of tooth erosion may be reduced by half.

Interestingly, the researchers found that adding fruit flavourings to beverages — for example, adding lemon to hot water — made them just as acidic as cola.

Your teeth are strong, but they’re not indestructible. Most popular drinks are very high in acid, and this acidity can damage your enamel. Once it is damaged, you’ll need your dentist’s help so that it doesn’t wear away more..

Dangers of Acidic Drinks

Drinks with a low pH level can cause a variety of oral health problems, but it begins when they eat away at the hard, outer layer of your teeth. Enamel erosion is a problem because enamel that becomes destroyed can’t grow back. Unlike other materials in your body, your enamel doesn’t have any living cells, so there’s no way for it to heal itself.

When your tooth enamel erodes, the sensitive, yellow-coloured dentine underneath is exposed. This is why your teeth will start to look discoloured when you don’t take care of them. But the exposed dentine doesn’t just have cosmetic downsides; it can also lead to painful dental conditions like tooth sensitivity. People with sensitive teeth experience pain when they drink or bite into hot, cold, sweet, acidic or spicy foods and drinks, and it can have adverse effects on their diet in the long run.

Common Acidic Drinks

Studies have indicated diet soda is not any more tooth-friendly than regular soda. Although it is sugar-free, it’s still overwhelming to your enamel if you drink it regularly. Even surprisingly small quantities of soda can damage your teeth; as little as one glass per day has been linked to damage. Fruit juices contain healthy vitamins and minerals, you may assume they’re healthy for your teeth as well. Sadly, this isn’t the case.

 

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Orange juice and similar citrus-sourced liquids are packed with Vitamin C, but they’re packed with tooth-damaging acids as a result.

The Oral Health Foundation is a great source of further information, you may find this web site  interesting.

For more information and advice contact us via our website  www.harrow-dentist.com


Who brushes your children’s teeth

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Would you let your child cross the road on his or her own ?

Do you allow your child to brush his or her teeth ?

How old do will you your child be when you allow  your son or daughter  to cross the road on their own ?

One of the main causes of tooth decay in children is poor oral hygiene, more specifically inefficient brushing of teeth. What happens when we let our children do the brushing on their own?

During consultation, parents  often say “My child knows how to do it”, “My child does not want me to brush his/her teeth” or “I want my child to be independent.”Many parents allow their children to brush their teeth by themselves. What happens then? The child does a very poor job of cleaning his/her teeth, and ultimately, the end result is dental problems.

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Every child is different but in general parents should brush their child’s teeth until they are about 8 to 10 years old . Depending on the child (parental judgement ! ), this about the same age as you might allow them to cross the road on their own.Remember that it is very important that parents continue to supervise their children’s brushing until the age 10 to 12. This is to make sure that they’re doing it thoroughly. Brushing should be done for two minutes minimum twice a day.

Brushing is a skill. Like many skills, it take years to learn it and be good at it. Young children usually do not have the manual dexterity to brush or floss properly. If your child wants to do it by himself, let him/her ! It’s a great way to practice, but ALWAYS make sure that you brush their teeth before or after they have done it for themselves. For older children aged 10 to 12 years, make sure that you supervise them. Be there when your child brushes his/her  teeth and make sure that your child is doing it well. Reinforce whenever necessary.

 

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International  Kissing day – 6 July 2018.Are you ready?

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We all remember our first kiss—it was completely exhilarating, probably awkward, and may have involved braces. But kissing is an age-old practice with significance that extends far beyond just romance. The act of kissing has many meanings and takes many forms, from a hello kiss to a kiss goodbye. No matter which type of kiss you prefer, International Kissing Day on July 6 is the perfect time of year to celebrate this simple but powerful gesture.

  1. It’s a full face workout
    A simple pucker kiss only involves two muscles. Who needs the gym when a make-out session will get our hearts racing and our muscles working?
  2. Kissing makes us happy and relieves stress
    Kissing serves as a natural relaxer that makes us feel happy and at peace. By stimulating our brain to release feel-good chemicals, kissing makes us feel both calm and excited at the same time. Had a stressful day? Kiss someone!
  3. Kissing crosses language and cultural boundaries
    Kissing is a cross-cultural form of communication that means the same things in every country—regardless of language, ethnicity, or religion. By kissing, you can communicate complex emotions without having to exchange any words with your kissing partner.

 

When you are in the personal space of your friend or partner bad breath can be really off putting.

Mouth odour ( bad breath or halitosis) is a social and health concern. Bad breath may be due to the food we eat, poor oral hygiene, gum disease or an underlying medical condition. It’s not always easy to tell if you have bad breath. Other people may notice it first, but could feel uncomfortable telling you. It takes great courage of a friend or partner to tell you that they are worried by your bad breath.

Are you comfortable and confident that you will not embarrass yourself  on 6 July.

We are here to help!

If you have any concerns, please read on and contact us for advice.

Bad breath is a common problem that can affect anyone at any age.

About one in four people are thought to have bad breath (halitosis) on a regular basis.

 What causes bad breath?

Bad breath can be the result of numerous things, but it’s usually caused by poor oral hygiene. If bacteria builds up in your mouth, it can cause your breath to smell.

Bacteria break down pieces of food in the mouth, releasing unpleasant-smelling gas. Any food trapped in your teeth will be broken down by bacteria, causing bad breath.

Persistent bad breath can sometimes be a sign of gum disease.

Eating strongly flavoured foods, such as onions and garlic, can also cause your breath to smell, as can smoking and drinking a lot of alcohol.

Occasionally, bad breath can occur following an infection or illness, or as a result of taking certain types of medication.

Treatment for bad breath (halitosis) will depend on its cause.

Usually, the most effective treatment is improving your dental hygiene. As part of your daily routine, you should:

  • Brush your teeth and gums.
  • Floss between your teeth.
  • Clean your tongue.

Cleaning your teeth

Your dentist will probably recommend that you brush your teeth at least twice a day using fluoride toothpaste.

Here are some tips on how to brush your teeth and keep your mouth healthy:

  • Choose a small or medium-sized toothbrush with soft, multi-tufted synthetic bristles.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three to four months.
  • Brush your teeth for at least two minutes. Keep a toothbrush at work or school so you can brush your teeth after lunch.
  • Brush all areas of your teeth, paying particular attention to where your teeth and gums meet.
  • Your dentist or oral hygienist may recommend using a special single-tufted brush for specific problem areas of your mouth.
  • Use a separate toothbrush or a tongue scraper to lightly brush your tongue. Some toothbrushes have a tongue cleaner on the back of the brush head.
  • Use dental floss to clean between your teeth and remove trapped food that could cause tooth decay. Brushing on its own only cleans about 60% of the tooth’s surface.
  • Your dentist may recommend that you rinse your mouth daily using an anti-bacterial or anti-odour mouthwash. This shouldn’t replace brushing, but can be included as part of your daily routine.
  • To help prevent tooth erosion, avoid brushing your teeth for 30 minutes after drinking an acidic drink, such as fruit juice, or eating acidic fruit, such as oranges.

Cleaning dentures

If you wear dentures, you should take them out at night to give your mouth a chance to rest. Clean your dentures thoroughly before putting them in the next morning. Follow the advice outlined below.

  • Don’t use toothpaste to clean your dentures, as it can scratch the surface and cause stains.
  • Clean your dentures thoroughly using soap and lukewarm water, denture cream or a denture-cleaning tablet.
  • Use a separate toothbrush to clean your dentures.

If you follow this routine, your dentures should stay clean and fresh. It will also help prevent the build-up of plaque, which can cause bad breath.

Fresh breath tips

  • Eat a healthy, balanced dietand avoid eating strongly flavoured or spicy food.
  • Cut down on sugary food and drink, as it can increase the amount of bacteria in your mouth.
  • Reduce your alcohol
  • Stop smoking.
  • Cut down on coffee.
  • Drink plenty of waterto help prevent your mouth becoming dry.
  • Chew sugar-free gum after eating, to stimulate the flow of saliva. This will help clean away any remaining food particles.

Make sure you visit your dentist for regular check-ups. Having regular dental care will ensure that any plaque is removed from your teeth, particularly in areas that are difficult to reach.

Your dentist can recommend the best way to clean your teeth and gums, and point out areas you might be missing. They can also identify any signs of gum disease and ensure early treatment.

 

Gastrointestinal problems

If your bad breath is caused by a gastrointestinal problem, such as an H. pylori infection or gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), you may be referred to a gastroenterologist.

Your recommended treatment will depend on the specific gastrointestinal condition that you have. For example, if you have a stomach ulcer, you may need a combination of two or three different antibiotics and a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). This is known as eradicaton therapy.

Treating and preventing bad breath

Improving oral hygiene is usually enough to cure bad breath and prevent it happening again.

Your dentist can advise you about ways to improve your oral health and will recommend:

  • regularly brushing your teeth and gums
  • flossing between your teeth
  • keeping your tongue clean

Read more about treating and preventing bad breath.

When to see your GP

If you still have bad breath after making changes to your dental hygiene, see your GP. There may be a medical cause that needs investigating.

Don’t try to hide the smell of your breath before visiting your dentist or GP, because it will make it more difficult for them to find out what’s causing the problem.

Do I have bad breath?

It’s not always easy to tell if you have bad breath. Other people may notice it first, but could feel uncomfortable telling you. It takes great courage of a friend or partner to tell you that they are worried by your bad breath.

A simple test to find out whether you have bad breath is to lick the inside of your wrist with the back of your tongue and wait for a few seconds until the saliva dries. If your wrist smells unpleasant, it’s likely your breath does too.

www. harrow-dentist.com

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