Hidden tooth infections increase heart disease risk by almost three times

September  2016

Undetected tooth infections could increase the risk of heart disease by almost three times, according to new research.

The study, published in the Journal of Dental Research1, has found that people with untreated tooth infections are 2.7 times more likely to have cardiovascular problems, such as coronary artery disease, than patients who have had treatment of dental infections.

With cardiovascular diseases being a contributor in an estimated 30 per cent of all deaths globally, leading health charity, the Oral Health Foundation, wants to encourage more regular dental visits, especially if we are experiencing toothache, sensitivity or bleeding gums.

Speaking on the issue Dr Nigel Carter OBE, CEO of the Oral Health Foundation, said: “This research is very worrying as tooth infections are initially caused by tooth decay which is triggered by poor oral hygiene routines and a diet high in sugar.

“The major signs of root infection (usually known as a dental abscess) include pain, often when biting down on the tooth, and sometimes swelling. The tooth may also become discoloured. But sometimes infection does not immediately present with these symptoms and can go undetected for some time.

“Thankfully, maintaining good basic oral health and cutting your risk is very easy. By brushing our teeth last thing at night and at least one other time during the day with a fluoride toothpaste; cut down on the amount of sugary foods and drinks and how often we have them and visiting our dentist regularly, as often as they recommend, we can help prevent disease, not only in the mouth but the whole body too.”

As well as looking after your oral health preventing gum disease can be boosted by a healthy diet, weight control, exercise and not smoking.

“Infections occur when decay reaches the centre of the tooth, the dental pulp, when the tooth dies a reservoir of bacteria spreads beyond the end of the root and can enter the bloodstream. Treatment for this would usually be a root canal treatment to remove all of the infected tissue and prevent bacteria spreading,” Dr Carter added.

“These new findings add to the existing links between gum disease and cardiovascular disease. It has previously been established that people with gum disease almost twice as likely to develop heart disease than people without it, this makes the need for good oral care even more important.

“Over recent years’ problems in the mouth have also been linked to other serious conditions such as diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease and problems with pregnancy, so it is vital that we see our oral health as a priority.”

The Oral Health Foundation welcomes more research into this matter as it may be a way to prevent many instances of cardiovascular disease around the world and ultimately save lives.

With thanks to the British dental Health Foundation 


Oral Health and Rheumatoid Arthritis

 

Poor oral health may be linked to rheumatoid arthritis, based on a new study.

Researchers from the University of Louisville determined that poor oral health can raise the risk of rheumatoid arthritis based on the presence of an enzyme that is around when a person has gum disease. This enzyme, called peptidylarginine deiminanse, has also been associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

Rheumatoid arthritis is a condition in which one’s joints become swollen and painful.

The problem with this enzyme is that it results in the body transforming some proteins into a form of protein called citrulline. The body often confuses citrulline and thinks it will cause problems and attacks it as a result. This produces inflammation in people who deal with autoimmune conditions like rheumatoid arthritis.

Previous studies have pointed to links between oral health and rheumatoid arthritis, with many determining that the problem is more widespread among people with gum disease.

The researchers analysed other forms of oral bacteria and concluded that none had any impact on rheumatoid arthritis.

More research on the relationship between oral health and rheumatoid arthritis could prove to be valuable. There is also a large amount of evidence that connects oral health and systemic problems. Many studies have shown the correlation between gum disease and a higher risk of stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, heart disease and numerous other health problems.

We are here to help you – call us today on 020 84272543
Contact us via our websire  www.harrow-dentist.com
Acknowledgements to : Today’s Dental News 

Ditch The Smoking Habit for Excellent Oral Health

ditch your smoking habit.October 2015

There are a lot of tobacco users in this country. Whether it’s smoking, dipping, or any other kind of activity, tobacco can leave your mouth, and especially your smile, worse off. Think about it. There are countless carcinogens inside of a single cigarette that can have devastating effects on the appearance of your teeth. Yellow teeth are most often associated with smoking, but your tongue can turn yellow as well. It isn’t just the appearance of your teeth that should be important, your overall health is put into question with each puff. Oral cancer and other ailments are widely associated with tobacco use and for good reason. Gum disease and other ailments can also increase in size and scope when you smoke or dip. Do yourself a favor: stop.

Oral cancer: According to the American Cancer Society, roughly 90% of patients with oral cancer have partaken in tobacco use of some kind. Did you know smokers are six times more likely to develop oral cancer than non-smokers? Simply put, the longer you use tobacco, the greater your risk for oral cancer.

Gum disease: Tobacco doesn’t just do a number on your teeth, your gums are also caught in the crosshairs. Periodontal disease, or gum disease as it’s more commonly known, accounts for almost 50% of smoking-related diseases. That’s an astronomical number. The only way to combat it is through surgical and nonsurgical treatment.

There’s no such thing as a “safe” tobacco. All tobacco is bad for your oral health, period. There are certain steps you can take to avoid oral cancer or periodontal disease, or both. All it takes is dedication and the willingness to be proactive about your oral and overall health.

  1. Quit smoking. It’s that easy. Your risk of oral health problems is dramatically decreased. The longer you don’t have a puff, your risks are practically depleted.
  1. Go to your dentist regularly. Getting a regular dental checkup can work wonders for your oral health. He or she can detect oral cancer if any symptoms are present.
  1. Practice proper brushing and flossing techniques. Since tobacco has so many harmful carcinogens, it can leave your gums overheated. Brushing and flossing thoroughly can help combat against oral cancer and helps you maintain great dental health.

It’s never too late to kick the smoking habit. Your oral health is a huge concern when it comes to tobacco use. Don’t battle oral cancer or other ailments later on in life. Keep your mouth as healthy as it can possibly be – kick cigarettes, and other tobacco products to the curb.

We are here to help – contact us via our website  www.harrow-dentist.com  or call 02084272543

acknowledgement to Best Dentist News


Ditch The Smoking Habit for Excellent Oral Health

ditch your smoking habit.August 2015

There are a lot of tobacco users in this country. Whether it’s smoking,  or any other kind of activity, tobacco can leave your mouth, and especially your smile, worse off. Think about it. There are countless carcinogens inside of a single cigarette that can have devastating effects on the appearance of your teeth. Yellow teeth are most often associated with smoking, but your tongue can turn yellow as well. It isn’t just the appearance of your teeth that should be important, your overall health is put into question with each puff. Gum disease and other ailments can also increase in size and scope when you smoke. Do yourself a favour: stop.

Oral cancer: According to the American Cancer Society, roughly 90% of patients with oral cancer have partaken in tobacco use of some kind. Did you know smokers are six times more likely to develop oral cancer than non-smokers? Simply put, the longer you use tobacco, the greater the risk.

Gum disease: Tobacco doesn’t just do a number on your teeth, your gums are also caught in the crosshairs. Periodontal disease, or gum disease as it’s more commonly known, accounts for almost 50% of smoking-related diseases. That’s an astronomical number. The only way to combat it is to quit but you may also require either surgical and non-surgical treatment.

There’s no such thing as a “safe” tobacco. All tobacco is bad for your general and oral health.. There are certain steps you can take to avoid oral cancer or periodontal disease, or both. All it takes is dedication and the willingness to be proactive about your oral and overall health.

  1. Quit smoking. It’s that easy. Your risk of oral health problems is dramatically decreased. The longer you don’t have a puff, your risks are practically depleted.
  1. Go to your dentist regularly. Getting a regular dental checkup can work wonders for your oral health. He or she may be able to detect abnormalities at an early stage.
  1. Practice proper brushing and flossing techniques. Since tobacco has so many harmful carcinogens, it can leave your gums overheated. Brushing and flossing thoroughly can help combat against oral cancer and helps you maintain great dental health.

It’s never too late to kick the smoking habit. Your oral health is a huge concern when it comes to tobacco use. Keep your mouth as healthy as it can possibly be – kick cigarettes, and other tobacco products to the curb.

Aknowledgement to Best Dentist News


Mothers to be

May 2014

pregnancy and oral healthThe months before you welcome a new member to your family will be some of the most exciting months in your life. But those nine months also come with changes, and not just the most obvious one.

For instance, studies have shown that pregnant women are more vulnerable to gum disease than women who aren’t pregnant. Studies have also shown that there’s a link between gum disease and certain complications, like preterm birth or low-birth weight.

All of which means that if you’re currently pregnant, you need to make your oral health a priority.

It’s common for pregnant women to experience the swollen, bleeding gums associated with mild gum disease. Why? Because of the increased amount of hormones in the body. As your hormones increase, your gums become more prone to irritation from plaque, potentially leading to gingivitis.

So what steps can you take to protect your smile? Here are three to consider:

  • Pay special attention to your gumline when you brush
  • Avoid starchy or sugary foods and instead stick to a diet high in fruits and vegetables
  • Talk to your dentist about extra appointments or home care tips

As a mom-to-be, you want to give your little one the best possible start in life. Making your oral health a priority during the nine months of your pregnancy are one way you can do that.Call the Harrow Dental Centre on 020 84272543  today to reserve an appointment. Working side-by-side with your dentist, a healthy smile during pregnancy is possible.Contact us via our website  www.harrow-dentist.com

With acknowledgements to Best Dentist News

 

 


Prevent Periodontal Disease for Better Overall Health

 

February 2014

shutterstock dentist with patient

When most people consider the topic of good oral hygiene, the first thing they think about is teeth. You brush and floss your teeth to keep them white and cavity-free, but how much do you think about your gums? Often overlooked, the importance of healthy gums goes beyond the matter of a pretty smile. In fact, gums that are allowed to become infected can actually make you seriously ill.

While the initial effects of gingivitis and periodontitis are severe enough on their own – bleeding gums, inflammation, redness and eventual tooth loss, to name a few – the complications of untreated gum disease can be far more serious. When the bacteria from infected gums is inhaled or released into the bloodstream, it can travel throughout the body, wreaking havoc on other organs and tissues.

The most common systemic complications associated with periodontal disease are coronary artery disease, respiratory issues, diabetes and arthritis. In addition to addressing the gum disease itself, patients must take special care to treat any other conditions that arise because of it.

Some problems associated with chronic periodontal disease affect not only the individual patient, but others as well. Pregnant women with gum disease, for example, are significantly more likely to give birth to underweight babies. Infants who begin life at a low birth weight can suffer from a number of potentially serious complications, including respiratory distress shortly after birth. This is why proper oral health care is so crucial for women, especially when they are pregnant.

If your gums bleed when you brush your teeth or show any signs of redness and swelling, it’s time to see your dentist for periodontal treatment. In most cases, the damage caused by plaque and tartar buildup can be reversed with consistent professional care. Talk to your oral care professional to find out how you can protect yourself and lower your risk of serious infection and illness associated with gum disease.

For further information ,contact the Harrow Dental Centre via our website  www.harrow-dentist.com or call 020 84272543

Acknowlegements to Best Dentist News

A healthier smile for 2014

shutterstock_120541276

Now that 2014 is here, people are trying to stick to their resolutions and make a better version of themselves for the New Year. Though losing weight or being more organized are good resolutions, there is one resolution that is oftentimes overlooked, and that is the resolution to have a healthier smile. Believe it or not, making sure you are in tip-top oral health means many other parts of your body are healthier. For 2014, why not make the commitment to yourself to be a healthier you?

Most people are advised visit the dentist every six months. During a routine examination , your dentist will complete an oral cancer screening protocol and check for periodontal (gum) disease, making sure there are no early signs and, if there are, treat it right away. They will look at every single tooth, checking for cavities, decay, cracks, and other possible harm. They may also take  X-rays , making sure there are no underlying problems that can’t be seen.

Your dentist may recommend an oral hygiene therapy visit .This aspect of dental care is an opportunity to remove tartar from below the gum line, while root planing smoothes out the rough surfaces where plaque has built up. Some people are advised to have an oral hygiene therapy session every 3 to 4 months.

By taking care of your dental needs, you reduce your risk of heart disease, oral cancer, severe tooth decay, and other possible health problems. You will be able to smile with confidence, knowing that your mouth is clean, healthy, and dazzling!

Give yourself the gift of excellent oral health this year, and you will not be sorry. Contact us today via our website www.harrow-dentist.com or call 020 84272543.

With acknowledgements to Best Dentist News