Smile !

With the constant evolution of technology, more and more people are thinking about their image. The several leading causes of this growing phenomenon include social media, TV, magazines, and the overarching desire to look younger.

When a picture is posted on Facebook or Instagram, for example, no one wants to feel bad about themselves. If someone scrolls through their pictures on Facebook and feels that they have some weight to lose; the individual will feel more pressured and motivated to lose the weight to show the world that they look better than before.

This is happening all around us and is being reinforced by the cultural and societal norms of the twenty-first century. Celebrities in magazines and on TV have the desired look of tall and slim, with beautiful features, including their teeth.

When a photographer takes a photo and asks the subject to smile, people don’t want to be embarrassed or ashamed of their teeth. Nowadays, the average person is more likely to invest in teeth whitening as well as aesthetic dentistry for the constant search of perfection. When someone trips and cracks a tooth, their first instinct is to go running to the dentist in order to fix the broken tooth. In addition, coffee addicts are buying teeth whiteners to remove the unwanted stains on their teeth. Everyone wants to feel and look beautiful within the definition set by the world around them. Brushing and flossing is not satisfying anymore because individuals do not believe that it does a sufficient job cleaning their teeth. People want bright, clean and flawless teeth.

There is some confusion about the terms cosmetic or aesthetic dental care;

Aesthetic dentistry is essentially where science and artistic principles are combined to provide great dentistry for you.Therefore, while it is about improving the way all your teeth look, it’s also about improving your oral health. It actually embraces all kinds of dental treatments and has one aim…to ensure you get the very best outcome in terms of function, appearance and of course oral health. Cosmetic dentistry is as the name suggests is more about sorting out the visual aspects of your teeth such as tooth whitening or orthodontic treatment. Such treatments are by definition non-invasive and not intended to change the structure of your teeth. Essentially the terms have the same aim – to offer you the smile you deserve

The training that is necessary to become an ‘aesthetic dentist’ is long and difficult, but the reward is in seeing people visibly regain the  confidence of a smile.The team at the  Harrow Dental Centre believes that good dental hygiene is the foundation of all the cosmetic and aesthetic dental care we provide.We can be contacted via our web site or on 020 84272543


Our Tips for a Healthy Mouth

Good oral health can have so many wonderful life-changing benefits.  From greater self-confidence to better luck in careers and relationships, a healthy smile can truly transform your visual appearance, the positivity of your mind-set, as well as improving the health of not only your mouth but your body too.

As part of National Smile Month, we have put together some top tips covering all areas of your oral health, to help keep you smiling throughout the campaign.

 

Caring for your mouth

  • Brush your teeth last thing at night and at least one other time during the day with a fluoride toothpaste.
  • Clean in between your teeth at least once a day using interdental brushes or floss.
  • To check if you have bad breath, lick your wrist, let it dry and give it a sniff, if it smells your breath probably does too.
  • If you use mouthwash don’t use it directly after brushing as you rinse away the fluoride from your toothpaste.
  • Quit smoking to help reduce the chances of tooth staining, gum disease, tooth loss, and in more severe cases mouth cancer.
  • Make sure your toothpaste contains fluoride; it helps strengthen tooth enamel making it more resistant to decay.
  • Change your toothbrush every two to three months or sooner if it becomes worn as it will not clean the teeth properly.

Visit your dentist

    • Visit your dentist regularly, as often as they recommend.
    • Some dentists may offer home visits for people who are housebound or have difficulty visiting the surgery.
    • If you are nervous about visiting the dentist, make sure they are aware of why so they can improve your treatment.
    • Help to overcome dental anxiety by taking a friend with you for support or listen to music to help you relax and focus on something else.
    • Your dentist will carry out a visual mouth cancer check during your regular check-up.
    • Visiting a dental hygienist can help give you excellent tips and advice on many dental problems
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Diet

  • Chew sugar-free gum after eating or drinking, especially sugary foods, to help protect your teeth and gums in between meals.
  • Wait an hour after eating or drinking anything before brushing as then enamel will be softened and you could be brushing away tiny particles.
  • A varied diet that is rich in vitamins, minerals, and fresh fruit and vegetables can help to prevent gum disease.
  • Finishing a meal with a cube of cheese is a great, and tasty, way to reduce the effect of acids from the foods damaging your teeth.
  • Avoid snacking and try to only have sugary foods and drinks at mealtimes, reducing the time your teeth come under attack.
  • If you have a sweet tooth try to choose sugar free sweets and drinks which contain xylitol as it can actively contribute to your oral health.

Children’s dental health

  • Weaning your baby off the bottle early can help them avoid developing dental problems.
  • All children up to three years old, should use a smear of toothpaste with a fluoride level of no less than 1000ppm (parts per million). After three years old, they should use a toothpaste that contains 1350ppm -1500ppm.
  • Parents should try and supervise your children’s tooth brushing until they are about 10 years old.

With acknowledgement to the British Dental Health Foundation 

See our website www.harrow-dentist.com


Don’t Put Off ‘Til Tomorrow What Your Dentist Can Address Today

January 2016

Ideally, you’d never procrastinate in doing responsible, grown-up things.

But we’re all guilty of it.

For some, it’s finances: “I’ll pay my bills next week!”
Or housework: “Those dirty dishes can soak in the sink for a while.”
Or even shopping: “I’ll just take a package of  noodles to work for lunch…”

93194005All kinds of things get pushed aside on our daily to-do lists because we’d rather not tackle them now. But when it comes to your dental healthcare, procrastinating is ill advised. Sure, your time is precious, but your health is irreplaceable. And though many people don’t realize there are benefits to their wallet associated with dental visits, there are many. Yes, dental treatment can help your family budget’s bottom line!

How is that possible, you ask? How can spending money actually save you money? Well, consider preventive maintenance on your teeth like the regular tune-ups and oil changes y for your car. You rotate the tires so they wear evenly, and replace the air filter when it gets grungy. All so your transportation keeps transporting you where you need to go, and you don’t have to pay big bucks to replace a part that could have been protected with preventive measures.

You know where this logic leads, and why it’s even more important to pay attention to your smile than your car. Your teeth need that same attention to keep doing what they do so well. Without it, the chances of developing a serious problem are much higher. Gum disease, tooth decay, and oral cancer are all conditions your family’s dentist will check for during a routine exam. If you’re not keeping appointments on a regular basis, a problem could be developing and you’d never know. At least, not until you experience a symptom that signals there’s a problem—and by then, the issue has progressed far beyond what your dentist or hygienist could catch in a simple exam.

A cavity or signs of disease are much easier and cost effective to treat in the early stages, so don’t delay your dental visit any longer. Put off shopping for a bathing suit, but don’t put off caring for your smile!

Harrow Dental Centre   wwww.harrow-dentist.com     +4420 84272543

Aknowledgment to Best Dentist News


Oral Cancer prevention

It’s common knowledge that the use of tobacco products can increase your overall risk of oral cancer, but there are other factors at play as well. Regular exercise, proper diets, and good habits are the

tooth painbuilding blocks for any healthy lifestyle, but they can significantly lower the possibility of many diseases. As always, regular brushing, flossing, and other beneficial dental care are your best tools for preventing the development of many diseases, and can aid in the fight against cancer. If you are already affected by oral cancer, this information may also help during your treatment and after.

Risk Factors for Oral Cancer

Tobacco usage, especially smokeless tobacco, such as chewing tobacco, is the only known cause of oral cancer. The best way to prevent oral cancer from developing is to completely stop the use of tobacco products. We know that it can be hard to quit this addictive habit, but it’s one of the best things that you can do for your health, and the health of your loved ones (secondhand smoke is a proven cause of other types of cancer). Your dentist and doctor can give you great advice and other tips to help you quit using tobacco products. Please turn to them for advice and let them know that you want to quit. They will be 100% supportive, which can really make a difference in your quest to stop!

If you drink three or more alcoholic beverages a day, you have a greater chance of getting oral cancer, as well as additional health problems. Drinking and smoking often coincide, which may attribute to the high cancer rates in those who use drink. However, studies have shown that frequent binge drinking also corresponds with an unhealthy diet, which can increase one’s risk for cancer. The best way to control these factors is to limit alcoholic beverage intake, and choose healthier foods. Leafy, green vegetables, foods which are high in vitamin B, green tea, and other antioxidant-rich foods have been continually linked to fighting or preventing cancer. You should avoid frying the vegetables as well, as this form of cooking effectively zaps the foods of any nutritive content.

Vitamin D is great for overall health, and has been known to lessen chances of acquiring cancer. High levels of vitamin D enable bones and teeth to absorb the calcium they need to stay strong and healthy. The natural way of getting vitamin D is from safe levels of sun exposure. Unfortunately, sun exposure is a risk factor for oral cancer on the lips, and for other types of cancer on other places in the body. Regular sunblock and limited time in the sun can help deter these unwanted effects. If you want to play it safe or if you’re exposure to the sun is already limited, you may want to talk to your dentist or doctor about vitamin D supplements. Adding these to your healthy diet could help you avoid oral cancer.

Need help? Don’t hesitate to ask!

If you’re unsure about your chances of developing oral cancer or other cancers, please turn to your healthcare professional. Your dentists and doctors want what’s best for your well-being, and should be able to provide helpful tips, or refer you to a trusted colleague who can. It’s never too late to improve your health!

For  further advice call the Harrow Dental Centre on 020 84272543 or contact us via our website www.harrow-dentist.com

Acknowledgement to Best Dentist News


Ditch The Smoking Habit for Excellent Oral Health

ditch your smoking habit.August 2015

There are a lot of tobacco users in this country. Whether it’s smoking,  or any other kind of activity, tobacco can leave your mouth, and especially your smile, worse off. Think about it. There are countless carcinogens inside of a single cigarette that can have devastating effects on the appearance of your teeth. Yellow teeth are most often associated with smoking, but your tongue can turn yellow as well. It isn’t just the appearance of your teeth that should be important, your overall health is put into question with each puff. Gum disease and other ailments can also increase in size and scope when you smoke. Do yourself a favour: stop.

Oral cancer: According to the American Cancer Society, roughly 90% of patients with oral cancer have partaken in tobacco use of some kind. Did you know smokers are six times more likely to develop oral cancer than non-smokers? Simply put, the longer you use tobacco, the greater the risk.

Gum disease: Tobacco doesn’t just do a number on your teeth, your gums are also caught in the crosshairs. Periodontal disease, or gum disease as it’s more commonly known, accounts for almost 50% of smoking-related diseases. That’s an astronomical number. The only way to combat it is to quit but you may also require either surgical and non-surgical treatment.

There’s no such thing as a “safe” tobacco. All tobacco is bad for your general and oral health.. There are certain steps you can take to avoid oral cancer or periodontal disease, or both. All it takes is dedication and the willingness to be proactive about your oral and overall health.

  1. Quit smoking. It’s that easy. Your risk of oral health problems is dramatically decreased. The longer you don’t have a puff, your risks are practically depleted.
  1. Go to your dentist regularly. Getting a regular dental checkup can work wonders for your oral health. He or she may be able to detect abnormalities at an early stage.
  1. Practice proper brushing and flossing techniques. Since tobacco has so many harmful carcinogens, it can leave your gums overheated. Brushing and flossing thoroughly can help combat against oral cancer and helps you maintain great dental health.

It’s never too late to kick the smoking habit. Your oral health is a huge concern when it comes to tobacco use. Keep your mouth as healthy as it can possibly be – kick cigarettes, and other tobacco products to the curb.

Aknowledgement to Best Dentist News


Five Reasons Why It’s Worthwhile to Smile

 

smilesNineteenth century novelist George Eliot once said, “Wear a smile and have friends; wear a scowl and have wrinkles.”

Yet smiling is more than just a way to convince your mother that you really did enjoy that meatloaf surprise. Even the smallest upward lip curve—whether or not it’s sincerely delivered—has far-reaching emotional and physical benefits.

Here are five advantages of turning that frown upside down:

1. Studies have shown that smiling lowers blood pressure. If you need some instant Zen, then all you have to do is smile. 

2. Smiling is almost a cure for the cold. Scientists have figured out that smiling produces more antibodies and white blood cells, which boosts your immune system. So take your vitamins and grin your way to wellness.

3. Analysis conducted at the University of Illinois suggested that people who are happier (and therefore smile a lot more), add almost a decade to their lifespan. That’s an extra ten years for not using your frowny face!

4. Endorphins (feel-good hormones) and serotonin (natural stress-reducers) are released when you smile. It’s the caffeine-free pick-me-up, and it works without having to double your espresso!

5. At DePauw University in Indiana, researchers determined that people who grin consistently have healthier marriages. It’s hard to fight over who ate the last strawberry when you’re grinning at each other, right?

Smiling costs nothing, requires no special equipment, and is accessible twenty-four-seven. And no one minds if you do it in public. As Les Giblin said, “If you’re not using your smile, you’re like a man with a million dollars in the bank and no chequebook.”

With acknowlegement  to Best Dentist News

 


Saliva and Oral Health

 

salivaWhen you think about oral health, you probably think about your gums and your teeth. After all, Americans spend about $1.8 billion on toothpaste  and $775 million on toothbrushes. We’re serious about our oral hygiene habits! (And it appears we put our money where our mouths are, too!)

So, when you consider your dental wellbeing, do you think about … saliva? Most people don’t think about the role saliva plays into dental care , and how important it is for maintaining excellent oral health. It’s true! Saliva is a necessary component in preventing cavities. It clears away bacteria that cling to your gums and enamel and cause disease and infection.

Saliva is produced by … wait for it … your salivary glands, and it’s made up of 99.5% water. Big surprise, right?  So, what’s the other .5%? Believe it or not, that teeny tiny part of saliva is comprise of several components, including electrolytes, mucus, glycoproteins, enzymes, and antibacterial compounds. Now, you know why saliva is the first step in the digestion process! It helps lubricate your food, making it easier to chew and swallow. Saliva also enhances your taste, not to mention your motor functions, which helps you to talk.

From a dental perspective, saliva helps break down the food particles that lodge in and around your teeth, and protects your enamel from bacterial decay. In addition, saliva actually remineralizes your teeth, using calcium and phosphates. If you stimulate your salivary glands by chewing sugar-free gum (or just eating anything, really), then the saliva produced actually has more of the good stuff in it—and is more effective in buffering that bacteria and keeps those pearly whites mineralized.

So, what happens if there’s a reduction in your saliva production? The less saliva you produce, the higher the risk of decay. It also makes eating and talking more difficult. Some medications and conditions such as Sjogren’s syndrome can cause saliva deficiencies, which can negatively impact your oral health. The reduction of saliva is called xerostomia—or dry mouth. Dry mouth also occurs as the result of aging or changes in hormones.

If you’re suffering from dry mouth, make an appointment with your dentist. At the Harrow Dental  Centre we can  diagnose the problem and get you treated. Remember, saliva is a very important part of your oral health!.  

If you have any questions or comment please contact us on  +44 2084272543  or via our web site 

http://www.harrow-dentist.com

With acknowledgements to Best Dentist News


High Blood Pressure and Oral Health

Get your blood pressure checked before your dental appointment!

High blood pressure, also called HBP or hypertension, can affect your ability to receive oral healthcare. Performing dental treatments on patients with hypertension can be detrimental! If your blood pressure is too high, many dentists won’t schedule procedures until you receive a health assessment from your medical doctor.

What is high blood pressure?

The two forces measured for your blood pressure reading are the blood pumping out of your heart and into your arteries (systolic), and the heart resting between beats (diastolic). Normal blood pressure readings for a healthy individuals who are 20 years and older should be below 120 for systolic and below 80 for diastolic. If blood pressure readings are consistently higher than 120/80 then you’re probably suffering from hypertension.

According to Heart.org, the website of the American Heart Association, “Untreated high blood pressure damages and scars your arteries.” High blood pressure increases risks of blood clots, organ damage, heart attacks, and strokes. High blood pressure also results increased plaque build-up and weakening blood vessels.

How does high blood pressure affect my dental health?

In a white paper released by the American Diagnostic Corporation, it states: “…elevations of blood pressure can increase a patient’s risk of experiencing a stroke or myocardial infarctions in the dental chair.” Patients with hypertension can also be in danger from local anesthetics that use vasoconstrictors, such as epinephrine, which increase blood pressure and heart arrhythmia.

High blood pressure medications can also affect your dental wellbeing. Some prescriptions cause dry mouth and may also alter your sense of taste. Meds with calcium blockers can also create gum overgrowth, which can affect a patient’s ability to chew and may require periodontal surgery to correct.

Will my dentist still treat me if I have high blood pressure?

Most dentists will not treat patients who have(untreated) high blood pressure, especially if your numbers are in the Stage 1 or higher range for hypertension.

This chart reflects blood pressure categories defined by the American Heart Association.

Blood Pressure
Category
Systolic
mm Hg (upper #)
  Diastolic
mm Hg (lower #)
Normal
 
less than 120 and less than 80
Prehypertension 120139 or 8089
High Blood Pressure
(Hypertension) Stage 1
140159 or 9099
High Blood Pressure
(Hypertension) Stage 2
160 or higher or 100 or higher
Hypertensive Crisis
(Emergency care needed)
Higher than 180 or Higher than 110

* Your doctor should evaluate unusually low blood pressure readings.

 If you’re being treated for high blood pressure, it’s important for you to discuss your condition and your medications with your dentist before beginning any treatments. Most patients being treated for high blood pressure can still have dental procedures, take anti-anxiety medications (often used for oral conscious sedation), and safely receive local anesthetics.

If you have any thoughts or questions regarding this post kindly post your comments below or email us via our website www.harrow-dentist.com or call 020 84272543

With acknowledgements to Best Dentist News

 


Gum Disease and Heart Health

tooth-heart

A large percentage (nearly 80%) of  British  adults suffer from  some form ( mild or severe)gum disease! Gum disease can devastate your oral health, causing serious dental problems. In fact, the number one reason for adult tooth loss  is untreated gum disease. Worse, though, is the effect that gum disease can have on your heart health.

Research conducted recently found that patients who had suffered heart attacks also suffered from poor oral health, too. And the AmericanAcademyof Periodontology notes that people diagnosed with gum disease are twice as likely to have heart disease.

How do you know if you have gum disease? You may have periodontal infection if your gums:

  • Bleed during or after brushing your teeth
  • Feel tender, swollen, or sore
  • Look red or discoloured
  • Form pockets around your teeth
  • periodontal disease can also be ‘silent’ and you can be unaware of a problem that only a thorough examination will detect .
  • teeth tender or feel as though they are moving  ‘

One of the simplest ways to ensure good gum health is to brush twice, floss once, and use a fluoridated oral rinse every day. At the Harrow Dental Centre we usually recommend  a regular  dental review  at least twice a year  and regular intervals between your Oral Hygiene visits tailored to your gum health needs .

According to research published in The New England Journal of Medicine, patients who were treated for periodontitis showed improvements in endothelial (cells that line blood vessels) function. So, getting your oral health in order can also improve your overall health, too!

If you have any thoughts or questions regarding this post kindly post your comments below or email us via our website www.harrow-dentist.com or call 020 84272543

With acknowledgements to Dental News


Five Reasons Why It’s Worthwhile to Smile

Five Reasons Why It’s Worthwhile to Smile

 Nineteenth century novelist George Eliot once said, “Wear a smile and have friends; wear a scowl and have wrinkles.”

Yet smiling is more than just a way to convince your mother that you really did enjoy that meatloaf surprise. Even the smallest upward lip curve—whether or not it’s sincerely delivered—has far-reaching emotional and physical benefits.

Here are five advantages of turning that frown upside down:

1. Studies have shown that smiling lowers blood pressure. If you need some instant Zen, then all you have to do is smile. Chanting is optional (especially if you’re standing in line at the grocery store).

2. Smiling is almost a cure for the cold. Scientists have figured out that smiling produces more antibodies and white blood cells, which boosts your immune system. So take your vitamins and grin your way to wellness.

3. Analysis conducted at theUniversity ofIllinois suggested that people who are happier (and therefore smile a lot more), add almost a decade to their lifespan. That’s an extra ten years for not using your frowny face!

4. Endorphins (feel-good hormones) and serotonin (natural stress-reducers) are released when you smile. It’s the caffeine-free pick-me-up, and it works without having to double your espresso!

5. AtDePauwUniversity inIndiana, researchers determined that people who grin consistently have healthier marriages. It’s hard to fight over who ate the last  Rolo  when you’re grinning at each other, right?

Smiling costs nothing, requires no special equipment, and is accessible twenty-four-seven. And no one minds if you do it in public. As Les Giblin said, “If you’re not using your smile, you’re like a man with a million dollars in the bank and no checkbook.”

If you have any thoughts or questions regarding this post kindly post your comments below or email us via our website www.harrow-dentist.com or call 020 84272543

With acknowlements to  Best Dentist News